↳ Kevein Books 'n' Reviews

Book Review: Fire and Ice by Paul Garrison

Michael Stone and his wife Sarah and their ten-year-old daughter Ronnie sail in a medical boat, Veronica, in the remote Pacific. Their duty is to attend the distress calls from the passing by ships or tankers, and in other time they visit remote isolated islands and atolls to tend the needs of poor. While they are sailing towards Pulo Helena (a chain of atolls) to help the poor living in the fales, they get a distress call from a massive tanker bound for China, carrying LNG.

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↳ Brain Pickings

Take Fate by the Throat: Beethoven on Creative Vitality and Resilience in the Face of Suffering

“Day by day I am approaching the goal which I apprehend but cannot describe.”


Take Fate by the Throat: Beethoven on Creative Vitality and Resilience in the Face of Suffering

“After all that has been said and mused upon the ‘natural ills,’ the anxiety, and wearing out experienced by the true artist,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning, who paved the way for women in the arts, wrote in reflecting on art and suffering from her sickbed, “is not the good immeasurably greater than the evil?” The great nineteenth-century poet is among the handful of highly influential artists who, like Frida Kahlo, surmounted an inordinate share of physical suffering to make art of unassailable beauty that heals the human spirit.

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↳ Brain Pickings

The Search for a New Humility: Václav Havel on Reclaiming Our Human Interconnectedness in a Globalized Yet Divided World

In his clever 1958 allegory I, Pencil, the libertarian writer Leonard Read used the complex chain of resources and competences involved in the production of a single pencil to illustrate the vital web of interdependencies — economic as well as ethical — undergirding humanity’s needs and knowledge. “We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality,” Dr.

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↳ Tara Lazar's Blog

SNOW SISTERS is a Storystorm Success Story (After 8 Years Of Idea Collecting & Combining)!

I’ve been quietly participating in Storystorm (formerly PiBoIdMo) since 2009. You know the type, the writer who lurks on the sidelines, observing and taking notes, but not necessarily being vocal in the comments. Well, it’s time for me to speak up!

I owe Storystorm a big THANK YOU for helping me come up with the idea for my debut picture book, SNOW SISTERS!, which is illustrated by Teagan White and being published by Knopf in January.

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↳ A Little Blog of Books

The Burning Girl by Claire Messud

‘The Burning Girl’ by Claire Messud tells the story of Julia Robinson and her friendship with Cassie Burnes during their childhood growing up in the small Massachusetts town of Royston. After meeting at nursery, they are inseparable throughout school but looking back years later, Julia remembers the circumstances which led to them drifting apart.

It is inevitable that any literary fiction about the nuances of female friendship in late childhood will now be compared to My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante, particularly when one character is dominant and outgoing (Lila/Cassie) while the other is awkward, lacks self-confidence and mostly lives in the shadow of their captivating friend (Elena/Julia).

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↳ Brain Pickings

The Vampire Problem: A Brilliant Thought Experiment Illustrating the Paradox of Transformative Experience

“Many of [life’s] big decisions involve choices to have experiences that teach us things we cannot know about from any other source but the experience itself.”

To be human is to suffer from a peculiar congenital blindness: On the precipice of any great change, we can see with terrifying clarity the familiar firm footing we stand to lose, but we fill the abyss of the unfamiliar before us with dread at the potential loss rather than jubilation over the potential gain of gladnesses and gratifications we fail to envision because we haven’t yet experienced them.

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↳ Kevein Books 'n' Reviews

Book Review: The End of Something by Ernest Hemingway

The End of Something is a short story by Ernest Hemingway set against the familiar backdrop: Hortons Bay in Michigan. Once Hortons Bay was a mill town and then logging occupation was at full sway; then the town was chirpy and lively; but when the mill disappeared and logging faded out, only remained a few vestiges of the past such as lime stones of the once-existed mill.

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↳ Shabd Studio

Book Review: The One Who Swam With The Fishes

I’ve always believed that Mahabharata was fought by great men but it was always women who were running the show, whether it is Satyavati or Draupadi. Imagine if there wouldn’t have been any Draupadi or Shikhandi, would there be any war in the first place? But the story doesn’t begin with Draupadi, it begins with Satyavati, The truth-teller, The One Who Swam With The Fishes and The One who will change the destiny of Kuru Dynasty.

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↳ Fiction Vixen

Weekly Feature: Seduction en pointe by Gemma Snow

Seduction en Pointe is my first full-length erotic romance novel, and spent the better part of two months in a storyboard outline on a giant whiteboard in the foyer. I’ve been writing both contemporary and historical erotic romance for over two years, through Cobblestone Press, the Wild Rose Press and Loose Id, and I have a new menage series debuting at the end of the summer, starting with The Lovin’ is Easy — my first Montana ranch series!

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↳ Brain Pickings

Trailblazing Astronomer Maria Mitchell on How We Co-Create Each Other and Recreate Ourselves Through Friendship

“We can count on so few people to go that hard way with us,” Adrienne Rich wrote in her exquisite meditation on the art of honorable human relationships. While it is hard enough to inoculate the integrity of the word “friend” against today’s epidemic misuse and overuse, it can be even harder to calibrate our expectations of those who have earned the benediction of the title — the chosen few we have admitted into the innermost chambers of the heart and entrusted with going that hard way with us. 

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↳ Fiction Vixen

Exclusive Excerpt: Turned Up by Erin Nicholas

I’ve been reading romance since my mom first let me into her book cupboard when I was about fourteen. LaVyrle Spencer, Julie Garwood, Debbie Macomber… they took my ‘happily ever after’ ideas from animated princesses to real people in the real world.

I’ve been writing romance almost as long. Many a family car trip was spent with my head bent over a spiral notebook in the back seat.

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↳ A Little Blog of Books

Solar Bones by Mike McCormack

‘Solar Bones’ by Mike McCormack won the Goldsmiths Prize last year and has been longlisted for the Man Booker Prize this year after it was picked up by the UK-based publisher Canongate. It tells the story of Marcus Conway, a middle-aged civil engineer living in a small town on the west coast of Ireland who is sitting at his kitchen table on All Souls Day reflecting on his life with his wife Mairead and their children Agnes and Darragh.

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↳ Kevein Books 'n' Reviews

Book Review: Summertime in Old New Delhi by Ruskin Bond

Having failed to make a reasonable source of income from writing stories and novels during his stay in Dehra after returning from London, the narrator Rusty comes down to Delhi to see some success in his slow-moving career. Th story – Summertime in Old New Delhi – is a part of ‘Rusty Comes Home’ book, this story shuttles between a couple of time accounts: childhood days spent with his father, and as a young grown-up writer moved to Delhi for a promising writing career.

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↳ Brain Pickings

How to Break Up Like a Poet: Edna St. Vincent Millay and the Art of the Kind, Clean Break

“I am most faithless when I most am true.”

Published at nineteen and a Pulitzer winner at thirty-three, the poet and playwright Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892–October 19, 1950) is one of the most influential writers in the English language. She was also an early and unselfconscious pioneer of free love, openly bisexual and polyamorous in an era when society was still gasping for air from the suffocating grip of Puritanical dogmatism and homosexuality was considered a mental disorder.

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↳ Machine Learning Mastery

Top Books on Natural Language Processing

Natural Language Processing, or NLP for short, is the study of computational methods for working with speech and text data.

The field is dominated by the statistical paradigm and machine learning methods are used for developing predictive models.

In this post, you will discover the top books that you can read to get started with natural language processing.

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↳ The New York Review Of Books

The Crackdown in Cambodia

“Descent into Outright Dictatorship,” read The Cambodia Daily’s final headline on Monday, a defiant last cry from a fiercely independent newspaper that has now been shut down by Prime Minister Hun Sen’s government. The waning of the international community’s influence over Hun Sen raises ethical questions about Western aid to Cambodia. It is now evident that foreign donors like the United States are financing the policies of an increasingly dictatorial government.

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